Showing posts with label Vegetarian Recipes. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Vegetarian Recipes. Show all posts

Thursday, July 21, 2011

Matar Paneer


"Matar" means peas and "paneer" means cheese. Alternately, you can substitute the paneer with potatoes in this recipe to give you Aloo Matar ("aloo" meaning potatoes, as you may have guessed...)

Recipe provided courtesy of Entertaining From an Ethnic Indian Kitchen.   

Serves 4-6
Ingredients:
• 12 ounces fried paneer pieces

Gravy
• 2 tablespoons vegetable oil
• 1 cup finely chopped onions
• 1 tablespoon
ginger garlic paste
• 1 tablespoon coriander powder
• 1 teaspoon cumin powder
• 1 teaspoon cayenne
• ½ teaspoon
turmeric
• ½ cup tomato sauce
• 1 teaspoon salt or to taste
• 1 ½ cups hot water
• 1 cup frozen peas
• 1 teaspoon garam masala powder
• ¼ cup heavy cream
• 2 tablespoons chopped fresh cilantro/coriander

 
Prep: Have the fried paneer pieces ready and set aside.

Heat oil in a medium saucepan over medium high heat. When the oil is hot, add the onions. 
Sauté until onions are translucent and the edges begin to brown. Add ginger garlic paste and stir fry for 1 minute. 
Stir in coriander powder, cumin powder, cayenne and turmeric and fry for about 2 minutes until all the spices are fried with the onion mixture.
Add tomato sauce and salt. 
Cook for another 2 - 3 minutes while stirring occasionally. Add hot water and peas. 
Reduce heat to medium, cover and cook for about 10 minutes until peas are tender. Stir in garam masala powder and cream and cook for 2 – 3 minutes. 
Note: You may want to cook the sauce for longer at this point in this procedure in order to produce a thick consistency. 
Stir the paneer into the gravy and heat through.
Garnish with cilantro and serve.
For more recipes, table setting ideas and gardening tips from the author of Entertaining From an Ethnic Indian Kitchen, check out Komali Nunna's blog.  

Monday, June 20, 2011

Vegetable and Paneer Kabobs

In honor of Father's Day, my family had the first of what is sure to be many barbeques for the summer. It's always great to have a tasty vegetarian option at barbeques...something other than plain old salad or coleslaw. I present to you my contribution to our family barbeque: vegetable and paneer kabobs. 

For measurements and the list of ingredients for the recipe, please refer to Entertaining From an Ethnic Indian Kitchen.  

Prep: If you are using bamboo skewers, soak them in water for at least half an hour.


In a medium sized non-reactive bowl, add yogurt, ginger garlic paste, lime juice, chickpea flour, cayenne, turmeric, ajwain powder, salt and 1 teaspoon chaat masala powder. Stir to combine.


Note: A non-reactive bowl is a bowl that will not have a chemical reaction with the foods that are placed in it. In this recipe, lime juice, which is highly acidic, would have had a chemical reaction with the metal in an aluminum bowl, giving the marinade a metallic taste...which you do NOT want! To sum up, do not use an aluminum bowl for this marinade.
Add paneer, bell peppers, and red onions. Mix thoroughly until all the pieces are evenly coated with the marinade. Cover and marinate for 1/2 - 1 hour in the refrigerator.
Preheat grill to medium high. Thread the paneer and vegetables onto the skewers. Grill them until evenly charred.

Alternative: You can broil these kabobs in the oven. Place skewers on a baking sheet lined with a metal rack. Place baking skeet with skewers 5-6 inches below the heating element. Broil while turning in between once or twice for 5-7 minutes or until golden brown. Remove from the oven.

Sprinkle with 1/4 teaspoon of chaat masala powder and serve.

For more on our family barbeque from the author of Entertaining From an Ethnic Indian Kitchen, check out Komali Nunna's barbeque blog post.

Wednesday, June 15, 2011

Stuffed Okra


Prepare yourself for a whole new flavor of okra! I have recently discovered this dish and it has only intensified my love for okra.

For measurements and the list of ingredients for the recipe, please refer to Entertaining From an Ethnic Indian Kitchen.   

In a small bowl, mix together coriander powder, amchoor powder (dry mango powder), cumin powder, dry ginger powder, turmeric, chickpea flour/besan, fennel seed powder, vegetable oil, garam masala powder, cayenne, black pepper and salt for the stuffing.
 
Rinse okra and dry with a paper towel and trim the cone part. Using a sharp paring knife, make a long slit, leaving ¼-inch top and bottom. Make sure you don’t cut through the okra.

Alternative: Use your fingernail to make the slit.

With your thumb, open the slit and stuff 1 teaspoon of stuffing. 


To season, heat 3 tablespoons of oil in a large shallow nonstick skillet, over medium high heat. When oil is hot, add cumin seeds with a pinch of asafetida.

Note: Asafetida is a gum extract from trees that can be found in Indian grocery stores. It acts as a digestive aid and prevents flatulence from occuring. If you are unable to find this ingredient, the rice will turn out fine without it.  

As soon as the cumin seeds sizzle, add okra in a single layer. Reduce heat to medium. Cook uncovered, turning okra gently from time to time, until lightly browned. It takes about 15-20 minutes.

Note: The okra should be cooked until it is crunchy, not gummy.


Garnish with garam masala powder. Serve as a side dish to any meal.
For more recipes, table setting ideas and gardening tips from the author of Entertaining From an Ethnic Indian Kitchen, check out Komali Nunna's blog.      

Sunday, May 22, 2011

Mushroom Pulao

I've realized that mushrooms can be quite polarizing: either you love them or you hate them. Here's a recipe for all my fellow mushroom-lovers out there!

For measurements and the list of ingredients for the recipe, please refer to Entertaining From an Ethnic Indian Kitchen.    

Prep: Wipe mushrooms with a damp paper towel to clean and slice them. Cut the onion and chilies.

Note: It is important not to wash mushrooms in water to avoid absorbing too much moisture.

Heat oil in a medium sauce pan over medium high heat. When the oil is hot, add bay leaf, cloves, cinnamon stick and cardamom pods.  
 
Note: Whole spices are added to flavor the dish and are not meant to be eaten.


When the cloves plump up, add onion and green chili.  


Sauté until the onion is translucent and edges begin to brown. Add ginger garlic paste and stir fry for 1 minute. Add mushrooms.


Sauté until mushrooms are slightly wilted. Stir in garam masala powder, basmati rice and salt. Mix thoroughly to coat all the rice grains with a thin film of oil and spices.


Stir in 3 ½ cups of water. At this point, you can transfer the mixture to an automatic rice cooker and finish cooking.


Alternative: Bring the rice mixture to a boil and reduce heat to the lowest setting. Cover with a lid and cook for about 20-25 minutes until the rice is done. Let it rest for 10 minutes. Fluff the rice with a fork. 

Garnish with cilantro.


Note: The recipe in Entertaining From an Ethnic Indian Kitchen also includes a garnish with paneer wrapped in edible silver leaves. I will leave that extra step for another day.

For more recipes, table setting ideas and gardening tips from the author of Entertaining From an Ethnic Indian Kitchen, check out Komali Nunna's blog.  

Saturday, May 7, 2011

Carrot Salad


This refreshing salad is popularly known as cachumbar in the state of Maharastra. It is a feast to the eyes as well as to the palate.

Recipe provided courtesy of Entertaining From an Ethnic Indian Kitchen.

Ingredients
  • 1/3 cup mung dal
  • 2 cups grated carrots
  • 1/3 cup coarsely grated fresh coconut
  • 1/3 cup grated raw mango (optional)
  • 2 tablespoons oil
  • 2 dry whole red chilies such as chile de arbol
  • 1 teaspoon black mustard seeds
  • 1-2 tablespoons lime juice
  • 1 teaspoon salt or to taste
  • 1/2 cup cilantro leaves
Soak dal in 2 cups of boiling water for 3 hours, and then drain.


Note: While the mung dal is soaking, grate all the other ingredients for the salad.

Combine dal, carrots, coconut and mango (if you are using it) in a salad bowl.

Note: Frozen coarsely grated fresh coconut can be bought in the freezer section of an Indian supermarket.

Heat oil in a small saucepan over medium heat. When the oil is hot add chilies. When the chilies start turn  dark, add mustard seeds and cover until the spluttering subsides. Remove from the heat and pour it over the carrot mixture along with lime juice and salt.


Gently toss to combine. Season to taste. Garnish with cilantro leaves.


Note: If you are using a raw mango, you can adjust the amount of lime juice depending on the sourness of the mango.

If you need more guidance with this recipe, check out the step by step video made by Komali Nunna.



For more recipes, table setting ideas and gardening tips from the author of Entertaining From an Ethnic Indian Kitchen, check out Komali Nunna's blog. 

Wednesday, April 6, 2011

Gobi Masala (Cauliflower Curry)

I was never a fan of cauliflower until I tried this recipe. It gave the cauliflower a succulent flavor that I never knew it was capable of having. I strongly encourage you to try cooking this easy recipe, even if you dislike cauliflower...you may become converted just like me!

Recipe provided courtesy of Entertaining From an Ethnic Indian Kitchen.

Serves 4-6
• 3 tablespoons vegetable oil
• 1 onion, finely chopped
• 1- inch piece ginger, minced
• 1 minced fresh green chili, such as serrano
• 1 tablespoon coriander powder
• 1 tomato, chopped
• 1 teaspoons salt or to taste
• ½ teaspoon turmeric

• 1 ½ - 2 pounds cauliflower, washed and cut into florets
• 1 teaspoon garam masala powder
• cilantro to garnish

Note: Chop all the ingredients in advance. It will make the process a lot easier and stress-free. 
Heat oil in a heavy bottom skillet over medium high heat. When the oil is hot, add the onion.
Fry until soft and edges begin to brown. Add minced ginger and chili and stir fry for 1 minute.
Add the coriander powder and stir fry for another minute.
Add the tomato and cook until it is soft and some of the moisture evaporates.
Stir in salt, turmeric and cauliflower. 
Cover the pan and cook for 10 minutes while stirring occasionally. 

Note: If there is a lot of liquid in the pan, remove the lid and cook until almost all the liquid evaporates. 

At the end, stir in garam masala powder. Mix thoroughly and serve.
Optional: Garnish with cilantro.

For more recipes, table setting ideas and gardening tips from the author of Entertaining From an Ethnic Indian Kitchen, check out Komali Nunna's blog. 

Sunday, February 27, 2011

Nimmakaya Pulihora (Lemon Rice)

This is one of my favorite recipes. When the recipe was originally developed in India, lemons were used (hence the name "lemon rice"). However, this recipe uses limes because the tartness of limes balances the spicy chilies and ginger in this recipe.

Note: This is a time-sensitive recipe. All the steps to add the ingredients must be done quickly or the dals and black mustard seeds will get burnt. I suggest measuring out all the ingredients ahead of time so that you don't waste time measuring while cooking.

Recipe provided courtesy of Entertaining From an Ethnic Indian Kitchen.

Ingredients
  • one recipe plain rice
  • 1/3 cup vegetable oil
  • 1/8 teaspoon asafetida
  • 2-3 dry whole red chilies such as chile de arbol
  • 1 tablespoon black mustard seeds
  • 2 tablespoons chena dal
  • 1 tablespoon white urad dal
  • ½ cup raw cashew nuts
  • 1-inch piece ginger, minced
  • 1-3 minced fresh green chilies, such as serrano
  • 20 fresh or dry curry leaves
  • ½ teaspoon turmeric        
  • 2 ½ teaspoons salt
  • 1/3 cup + 2 tablespoons lime juice
  • pomegranate seeds to garnish (optional)    
Prepare the rice according to the directions using only 3 ½ cups of water. Heat oil in a saucepan over medium high heat.   
Add asafetida and red chilies.  

Notes 
  • Asafetida is a gum extract from trees that can be found in Indian grocery stores. It acts as a digestive aid and prevents flatulence from occuring. If you are unable to find this ingredient, the rice will turn out fine without it.  
  • Red chilies are added for flavor only and are not meant to be eaten.
When the red chilies turn one shade darker, add the mustard seeds and cover until the spluttering subsides.   


Uncover and add white urad dal and chena dal. 


When the white urad dal turns golden brown, stir in the cashews. 


As soon as cashew nuts turn one shade darker, add curry leaves.  


As curry leaves turn crisp, add ginger, chilies, turmeric, and salt. Fry for one minute, and turn off the heat. 

 
Let it cool for 3 minutes and add lime juice.   


Now add lime juice mixture to cooked rice, and mix thoroughly.  


You must let the rice rest for at least ½ an hour for flavors to mingle before serving.   


Optional: Garnish with pomegranate seeds.

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