Showing posts with label Vegan Recipes. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Vegan Recipes. Show all posts

Wednesday, June 15, 2011

Stuffed Okra


Prepare yourself for a whole new flavor of okra! I have recently discovered this dish and it has only intensified my love for okra.

For measurements and the list of ingredients for the recipe, please refer to Entertaining From an Ethnic Indian Kitchen.   

In a small bowl, mix together coriander powder, amchoor powder (dry mango powder), cumin powder, dry ginger powder, turmeric, chickpea flour/besan, fennel seed powder, vegetable oil, garam masala powder, cayenne, black pepper and salt for the stuffing.
 
Rinse okra and dry with a paper towel and trim the cone part. Using a sharp paring knife, make a long slit, leaving ¼-inch top and bottom. Make sure you don’t cut through the okra.

Alternative: Use your fingernail to make the slit.

With your thumb, open the slit and stuff 1 teaspoon of stuffing. 


To season, heat 3 tablespoons of oil in a large shallow nonstick skillet, over medium high heat. When oil is hot, add cumin seeds with a pinch of asafetida.

Note: Asafetida is a gum extract from trees that can be found in Indian grocery stores. It acts as a digestive aid and prevents flatulence from occuring. If you are unable to find this ingredient, the rice will turn out fine without it.  

As soon as the cumin seeds sizzle, add okra in a single layer. Reduce heat to medium. Cook uncovered, turning okra gently from time to time, until lightly browned. It takes about 15-20 minutes.

Note: The okra should be cooked until it is crunchy, not gummy.


Garnish with garam masala powder. Serve as a side dish to any meal.
For more recipes, table setting ideas and gardening tips from the author of Entertaining From an Ethnic Indian Kitchen, check out Komali Nunna's blog.      

Sunday, May 22, 2011

Mushroom Pulao

I've realized that mushrooms can be quite polarizing: either you love them or you hate them. Here's a recipe for all my fellow mushroom-lovers out there!

For measurements and the list of ingredients for the recipe, please refer to Entertaining From an Ethnic Indian Kitchen.    

Prep: Wipe mushrooms with a damp paper towel to clean and slice them. Cut the onion and chilies.

Note: It is important not to wash mushrooms in water to avoid absorbing too much moisture.

Heat oil in a medium sauce pan over medium high heat. When the oil is hot, add bay leaf, cloves, cinnamon stick and cardamom pods.  
 
Note: Whole spices are added to flavor the dish and are not meant to be eaten.


When the cloves plump up, add onion and green chili.  


Sauté until the onion is translucent and edges begin to brown. Add ginger garlic paste and stir fry for 1 minute. Add mushrooms.


Sauté until mushrooms are slightly wilted. Stir in garam masala powder, basmati rice and salt. Mix thoroughly to coat all the rice grains with a thin film of oil and spices.


Stir in 3 ½ cups of water. At this point, you can transfer the mixture to an automatic rice cooker and finish cooking.


Alternative: Bring the rice mixture to a boil and reduce heat to the lowest setting. Cover with a lid and cook for about 20-25 minutes until the rice is done. Let it rest for 10 minutes. Fluff the rice with a fork. 

Garnish with cilantro.


Note: The recipe in Entertaining From an Ethnic Indian Kitchen also includes a garnish with paneer wrapped in edible silver leaves. I will leave that extra step for another day.

For more recipes, table setting ideas and gardening tips from the author of Entertaining From an Ethnic Indian Kitchen, check out Komali Nunna's blog.  

Saturday, May 7, 2011

Carrot Salad


This refreshing salad is popularly known as cachumbar in the state of Maharastra. It is a feast to the eyes as well as to the palate.

Recipe provided courtesy of Entertaining From an Ethnic Indian Kitchen.

Ingredients
  • 1/3 cup mung dal
  • 2 cups grated carrots
  • 1/3 cup coarsely grated fresh coconut
  • 1/3 cup grated raw mango (optional)
  • 2 tablespoons oil
  • 2 dry whole red chilies such as chile de arbol
  • 1 teaspoon black mustard seeds
  • 1-2 tablespoons lime juice
  • 1 teaspoon salt or to taste
  • 1/2 cup cilantro leaves
Soak dal in 2 cups of boiling water for 3 hours, and then drain.


Note: While the mung dal is soaking, grate all the other ingredients for the salad.

Combine dal, carrots, coconut and mango (if you are using it) in a salad bowl.

Note: Frozen coarsely grated fresh coconut can be bought in the freezer section of an Indian supermarket.

Heat oil in a small saucepan over medium heat. When the oil is hot add chilies. When the chilies start turn  dark, add mustard seeds and cover until the spluttering subsides. Remove from the heat and pour it over the carrot mixture along with lime juice and salt.


Gently toss to combine. Season to taste. Garnish with cilantro leaves.


Note: If you are using a raw mango, you can adjust the amount of lime juice depending on the sourness of the mango.

If you need more guidance with this recipe, check out the step by step video made by Komali Nunna.



For more recipes, table setting ideas and gardening tips from the author of Entertaining From an Ethnic Indian Kitchen, check out Komali Nunna's blog. 

Wednesday, April 6, 2011

Gobi Masala (Cauliflower Curry)

I was never a fan of cauliflower until I tried this recipe. It gave the cauliflower a succulent flavor that I never knew it was capable of having. I strongly encourage you to try cooking this easy recipe, even if you dislike cauliflower...you may become converted just like me!

Recipe provided courtesy of Entertaining From an Ethnic Indian Kitchen.

Serves 4-6
• 3 tablespoons vegetable oil
• 1 onion, finely chopped
• 1- inch piece ginger, minced
• 1 minced fresh green chili, such as serrano
• 1 tablespoon coriander powder
• 1 tomato, chopped
• 1 teaspoons salt or to taste
• ½ teaspoon turmeric

• 1 ½ - 2 pounds cauliflower, washed and cut into florets
• 1 teaspoon garam masala powder
• cilantro to garnish

Note: Chop all the ingredients in advance. It will make the process a lot easier and stress-free. 
Heat oil in a heavy bottom skillet over medium high heat. When the oil is hot, add the onion.
Fry until soft and edges begin to brown. Add minced ginger and chili and stir fry for 1 minute.
Add the coriander powder and stir fry for another minute.
Add the tomato and cook until it is soft and some of the moisture evaporates.
Stir in salt, turmeric and cauliflower. 
Cover the pan and cook for 10 minutes while stirring occasionally. 

Note: If there is a lot of liquid in the pan, remove the lid and cook until almost all the liquid evaporates. 

At the end, stir in garam masala powder. Mix thoroughly and serve.
Optional: Garnish with cilantro.

For more recipes, table setting ideas and gardening tips from the author of Entertaining From an Ethnic Indian Kitchen, check out Komali Nunna's blog. 

Sunday, February 27, 2011

Nimmakaya Pulihora (Lemon Rice)

This is one of my favorite recipes. When the recipe was originally developed in India, lemons were used (hence the name "lemon rice"). However, this recipe uses limes because the tartness of limes balances the spicy chilies and ginger in this recipe.

Note: This is a time-sensitive recipe. All the steps to add the ingredients must be done quickly or the dals and black mustard seeds will get burnt. I suggest measuring out all the ingredients ahead of time so that you don't waste time measuring while cooking.

Recipe provided courtesy of Entertaining From an Ethnic Indian Kitchen.

Ingredients
  • one recipe plain rice
  • 1/3 cup vegetable oil
  • 1/8 teaspoon asafetida
  • 2-3 dry whole red chilies such as chile de arbol
  • 1 tablespoon black mustard seeds
  • 2 tablespoons chena dal
  • 1 tablespoon white urad dal
  • ½ cup raw cashew nuts
  • 1-inch piece ginger, minced
  • 1-3 minced fresh green chilies, such as serrano
  • 20 fresh or dry curry leaves
  • ½ teaspoon turmeric        
  • 2 ½ teaspoons salt
  • 1/3 cup + 2 tablespoons lime juice
  • pomegranate seeds to garnish (optional)    
Prepare the rice according to the directions using only 3 ½ cups of water. Heat oil in a saucepan over medium high heat.   
Add asafetida and red chilies.  

Notes 
  • Asafetida is a gum extract from trees that can be found in Indian grocery stores. It acts as a digestive aid and prevents flatulence from occuring. If you are unable to find this ingredient, the rice will turn out fine without it.  
  • Red chilies are added for flavor only and are not meant to be eaten.
When the red chilies turn one shade darker, add the mustard seeds and cover until the spluttering subsides.   


Uncover and add white urad dal and chena dal. 


When the white urad dal turns golden brown, stir in the cashews. 


As soon as cashew nuts turn one shade darker, add curry leaves.  


As curry leaves turn crisp, add ginger, chilies, turmeric, and salt. Fry for one minute, and turn off the heat. 

 
Let it cool for 3 minutes and add lime juice.   


Now add lime juice mixture to cooked rice, and mix thoroughly.  


You must let the rice rest for at least ½ an hour for flavors to mingle before serving.   


Optional: Garnish with pomegranate seeds.

Plain Rice

A rice cooker is must-have when cooking Indian food. Remember to add 2 cups of water for every 1 cup of rice.
 
Recipe provided courtesy of Entertaining From an Ethnic Indian Kitchen.
Yield 4 cups cooked rice
  • 2 cups long grain rice
  • 3 3/4 cups water
Wash rice with several changes of water. Add rice and water to the rice cooker and follow the rice cooker's instructions to cook white rice.


Alternative: To cook rice on the stove instead of using a rice cooker, place rice and water in a heavy medium sauce pan and bring it to boil over medium high heat. Reduce heat to lowest setting, cover and cook for about 20-25 minutes, until rice is cooked and the surface is covered with steam holes. Let it rest for 5-10 minutes. Use a fork to fluff up the rice before serving.

For more recipes, table setting ideas and gardening tips from the author of Entertaining From an Ethnic Indian Kitchen, check out Komali Nunna's blog.

Wednesday, February 9, 2011

Fried Paneer Pieces

You can buy paneer from the refrigerator section of any Indian grocery store.

Alternative: Use queso fresco, a Mexican cheese that can be found in most supermarkets, including Costco.

Vegan substitution: Use tofu pieces instead of paneer pieces.

Yield about 12 ounces
  • 12 ounces paneer
  • 2 tablespoons all purpose flour
  • oil for pan frying 
 Cut paneer into 1 1/2-inch pieces.


Dredge the paneer pieces in all purpose flour, shaking off the excess flour.


Add enough oil to cover the bottom of a large skillet. Heat over medium high heat. When the oil is hot, add as many paneer pieces as the skillet can hold in a single layer without crowding.


Fry the pieces until golden brown evenly.


Using a slotted spoon, remove them onto a tray lined with a paper towel. Let them cool. Use as needed.

 
Note: You can refrigerate fried paneer for up to a week. You can freeze it for up to a month. 

For more recipes, table setting ideas and gardening tips from the author of Entertaining From an Ethnic Indian Kitchen, check out Komali Nunna's blog. 

Tuesday, February 8, 2011

Okra Fry

The wonderful thing about this recipe is that the okra can be cooked in the microwave, giving you the freedom to multi-task or relax while it cooks. 

Note: To select tender okra, snap the tip off with your fingers. If the tip snaps and breaks off, the okra is tender. If it doesn't, it is fibrous. 

For measurements and the list of ingredients for the recipe, please refer to Entertaining From an Ethnic Indian Kitchen
Rinse and dry okra with paper towels. Trim the ends and cut into 3/4-inch pieces.
Heat oil in a wok or skillet over medium high heat. When oil is hot, add the red chilies. 

Note: Whole red chilies are added for flavor. They are not meant to be eaten.

When the chilies turn dark, add mustard seeds and cover with a lid until the spluttering subsides.
Uncover and stir in cumin seeds. When cumin seeds sizzle, add curry leaves.
As soon as curry leaves are crisp, add the chopped onion.
Saute onion until translucent. Stir in okra. 
After the addition of okra to the pan, you can transfer the whole mixture to a microwave safe dish.
Cook in the microwave in 5 minute-intervals for 15-20 minutes (depending on how much okra you are cooking), uncovered at full power, stopping and stirring once or twice after every 5-minute interval. During the last minute of cooking, mix in salt, turmeric and cayenne. 

Alternative: To continue cooking on the stove, stir in okra, salt, turmeric, and cayenne in the wok or skillet. Reduce heat to medium and fry until okra is cooked for about 20-25 minutes while stirring occasionally.

Serve as a side dish to any meal.
For more recipes, table setting ideas and gardening tips from the author of Entertaining From an Ethnic Indian Kitchen, check out Komali Nunna's blog.
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