Showing posts with label Rices. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Rices. Show all posts

Sunday, May 22, 2011

Mushroom Pulao

I've realized that mushrooms can be quite polarizing: either you love them or you hate them. Here's a recipe for all my fellow mushroom-lovers out there!

For measurements and the list of ingredients for the recipe, please refer to Entertaining From an Ethnic Indian Kitchen.    

Prep: Wipe mushrooms with a damp paper towel to clean and slice them. Cut the onion and chilies.

Note: It is important not to wash mushrooms in water to avoid absorbing too much moisture.

Heat oil in a medium sauce pan over medium high heat. When the oil is hot, add bay leaf, cloves, cinnamon stick and cardamom pods.  
 
Note: Whole spices are added to flavor the dish and are not meant to be eaten.


When the cloves plump up, add onion and green chili.  


Sauté until the onion is translucent and edges begin to brown. Add ginger garlic paste and stir fry for 1 minute. Add mushrooms.


Sauté until mushrooms are slightly wilted. Stir in garam masala powder, basmati rice and salt. Mix thoroughly to coat all the rice grains with a thin film of oil and spices.


Stir in 3 ½ cups of water. At this point, you can transfer the mixture to an automatic rice cooker and finish cooking.


Alternative: Bring the rice mixture to a boil and reduce heat to the lowest setting. Cover with a lid and cook for about 20-25 minutes until the rice is done. Let it rest for 10 minutes. Fluff the rice with a fork. 

Garnish with cilantro.


Note: The recipe in Entertaining From an Ethnic Indian Kitchen also includes a garnish with paneer wrapped in edible silver leaves. I will leave that extra step for another day.

For more recipes, table setting ideas and gardening tips from the author of Entertaining From an Ethnic Indian Kitchen, check out Komali Nunna's blog.  

Sunday, February 27, 2011

Nimmakaya Pulihora (Lemon Rice)

This is one of my favorite recipes. When the recipe was originally developed in India, lemons were used (hence the name "lemon rice"). However, this recipe uses limes because the tartness of limes balances the spicy chilies and ginger in this recipe.

Note: This is a time-sensitive recipe. All the steps to add the ingredients must be done quickly or the dals and black mustard seeds will get burnt. I suggest measuring out all the ingredients ahead of time so that you don't waste time measuring while cooking.

Recipe provided courtesy of Entertaining From an Ethnic Indian Kitchen.

Ingredients
  • one recipe plain rice
  • 1/3 cup vegetable oil
  • 1/8 teaspoon asafetida
  • 2-3 dry whole red chilies such as chile de arbol
  • 1 tablespoon black mustard seeds
  • 2 tablespoons chena dal
  • 1 tablespoon white urad dal
  • ½ cup raw cashew nuts
  • 1-inch piece ginger, minced
  • 1-3 minced fresh green chilies, such as serrano
  • 20 fresh or dry curry leaves
  • ½ teaspoon turmeric        
  • 2 ½ teaspoons salt
  • 1/3 cup + 2 tablespoons lime juice
  • pomegranate seeds to garnish (optional)    
Prepare the rice according to the directions using only 3 ½ cups of water. Heat oil in a saucepan over medium high heat.   
Add asafetida and red chilies.  

Notes 
  • Asafetida is a gum extract from trees that can be found in Indian grocery stores. It acts as a digestive aid and prevents flatulence from occuring. If you are unable to find this ingredient, the rice will turn out fine without it.  
  • Red chilies are added for flavor only and are not meant to be eaten.
When the red chilies turn one shade darker, add the mustard seeds and cover until the spluttering subsides.   


Uncover and add white urad dal and chena dal. 


When the white urad dal turns golden brown, stir in the cashews. 


As soon as cashew nuts turn one shade darker, add curry leaves.  


As curry leaves turn crisp, add ginger, chilies, turmeric, and salt. Fry for one minute, and turn off the heat. 

 
Let it cool for 3 minutes and add lime juice.   


Now add lime juice mixture to cooked rice, and mix thoroughly.  


You must let the rice rest for at least ½ an hour for flavors to mingle before serving.   


Optional: Garnish with pomegranate seeds.

Plain Rice

A rice cooker is must-have when cooking Indian food. Remember to add 2 cups of water for every 1 cup of rice.
 
Recipe provided courtesy of Entertaining From an Ethnic Indian Kitchen.
Yield 4 cups cooked rice
  • 2 cups long grain rice
  • 3 3/4 cups water
Wash rice with several changes of water. Add rice and water to the rice cooker and follow the rice cooker's instructions to cook white rice.


Alternative: To cook rice on the stove instead of using a rice cooker, place rice and water in a heavy medium sauce pan and bring it to boil over medium high heat. Reduce heat to lowest setting, cover and cook for about 20-25 minutes, until rice is cooked and the surface is covered with steam holes. Let it rest for 5-10 minutes. Use a fork to fluff up the rice before serving.

For more recipes, table setting ideas and gardening tips from the author of Entertaining From an Ethnic Indian Kitchen, check out Komali Nunna's blog.
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