Showing posts with label Main Courses. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Main Courses. Show all posts

Thursday, July 21, 2011

Matar Paneer


"Matar" means peas and "paneer" means cheese. Alternately, you can substitute the paneer with potatoes in this recipe to give you Aloo Matar ("aloo" meaning potatoes, as you may have guessed...)

Recipe provided courtesy of Entertaining From an Ethnic Indian Kitchen.   

Serves 4-6
Ingredients:
• 12 ounces fried paneer pieces

Gravy
• 2 tablespoons vegetable oil
• 1 cup finely chopped onions
• 1 tablespoon
ginger garlic paste
• 1 tablespoon coriander powder
• 1 teaspoon cumin powder
• 1 teaspoon cayenne
• ½ teaspoon
turmeric
• ½ cup tomato sauce
• 1 teaspoon salt or to taste
• 1 ½ cups hot water
• 1 cup frozen peas
• 1 teaspoon garam masala powder
• ¼ cup heavy cream
• 2 tablespoons chopped fresh cilantro/coriander

 
Prep: Have the fried paneer pieces ready and set aside.

Heat oil in a medium saucepan over medium high heat. When the oil is hot, add the onions. 
Sauté until onions are translucent and the edges begin to brown. Add ginger garlic paste and stir fry for 1 minute. 
Stir in coriander powder, cumin powder, cayenne and turmeric and fry for about 2 minutes until all the spices are fried with the onion mixture.
Add tomato sauce and salt. 
Cook for another 2 - 3 minutes while stirring occasionally. Add hot water and peas. 
Reduce heat to medium, cover and cook for about 10 minutes until peas are tender. Stir in garam masala powder and cream and cook for 2 – 3 minutes. 
Note: You may want to cook the sauce for longer at this point in this procedure in order to produce a thick consistency. 
Stir the paneer into the gravy and heat through.
Garnish with cilantro and serve.
For more recipes, table setting ideas and gardening tips from the author of Entertaining From an Ethnic Indian Kitchen, check out Komali Nunna's blog.  

Sunday, May 22, 2011

Mushroom Pulao

I've realized that mushrooms can be quite polarizing: either you love them or you hate them. Here's a recipe for all my fellow mushroom-lovers out there!

For measurements and the list of ingredients for the recipe, please refer to Entertaining From an Ethnic Indian Kitchen.    

Prep: Wipe mushrooms with a damp paper towel to clean and slice them. Cut the onion and chilies.

Note: It is important not to wash mushrooms in water to avoid absorbing too much moisture.

Heat oil in a medium sauce pan over medium high heat. When the oil is hot, add bay leaf, cloves, cinnamon stick and cardamom pods.  
 
Note: Whole spices are added to flavor the dish and are not meant to be eaten.


When the cloves plump up, add onion and green chili.  


Sauté until the onion is translucent and edges begin to brown. Add ginger garlic paste and stir fry for 1 minute. Add mushrooms.


Sauté until mushrooms are slightly wilted. Stir in garam masala powder, basmati rice and salt. Mix thoroughly to coat all the rice grains with a thin film of oil and spices.


Stir in 3 ½ cups of water. At this point, you can transfer the mixture to an automatic rice cooker and finish cooking.


Alternative: Bring the rice mixture to a boil and reduce heat to the lowest setting. Cover with a lid and cook for about 20-25 minutes until the rice is done. Let it rest for 10 minutes. Fluff the rice with a fork. 

Garnish with cilantro.


Note: The recipe in Entertaining From an Ethnic Indian Kitchen also includes a garnish with paneer wrapped in edible silver leaves. I will leave that extra step for another day.

For more recipes, table setting ideas and gardening tips from the author of Entertaining From an Ethnic Indian Kitchen, check out Komali Nunna's blog.  

Thursday, May 19, 2011

Moghul Egg Korma


This mouth-watering recipe (one of my favorites) turned out to be a lot easier than I thought it would be. Of all the curries I've made so far, Moghul Egg Korma has been the first curry where I didn't make any mistakes the first time around! Just make sure you get all the ingredients together first because it is a time-sensitive recipe. It's also a great way to use up your eggs!

For measurements and the list of ingredients for the recipe, please refer to Entertaining From an Ethnic Indian Kitchen.     

Prep: Chop the onion, boil the eggs, and make the almond paste.

Heat oil in a wide-bottom skillet over medium high heat. When oil is hot, add cloves, cinnamon, and cardamom pods. Stir-fry for a few seconds. Add onion.   

Note: Whole spices are added for flavor only and are not meant to be eaten.
Saute onion until edges begin to brown. Add ginger garlic paste and stir for a minute. 
 
Add tomato paste and stir-fry for 2 minutes.
Add coriander powder, cayenne and paprika. Stir fry for a minute.
Add salt and 4 cups of water and bring it to a boil.
Reduce heat and simmer the sauce until thickened for about half an hour. Stir in almond paste and cream. Cook for 2 minutes. Add lime juice and stir to mix.

Note: Almond paste is not found in grocery stores. You can find an easy recipe for almond paste in Entertaining From an Ethnic Indian Kitchen.
Spread the eggs over the sauce. Simmer gently for 2 to 3 minutes.

Options:
1. Cut the eggs in half.
2. Keep the eggs whole but make a small slit in each of the eggs before adding them to the sauce, so that the flavor of the curry goes into the eggs.
Garnish with cilantro.                        

Serve with rice or chappati.

For more recipes, table setting ideas and gardening tips from the author of Entertaining From an Ethnic Indian Kitchen, check out Komali Nunna's blog.  

Saturday, April 23, 2011

Chicken Tikka Masala

Chicken tikka masala was actually developed in a restaurant in England, not India, as a solution for using leftover grilled chicken. Please note that in order to make chicken tikka masala, you must make chicken tikka first.

For measurements and the list of ingredients for the recipe, please refer to Entertaining From an Ethnic Indian Kitchen.     


Have chicken tikka ready.
Note: While the chicken tikka is roasting in the oven, gather and chop all the ingredients for the curry.

Heat the ghee in a large sauce pan over medium high heat. When the ghee is hot, add bay leaf and cardamom pods. Stir for a minute.

Note: Whole spices are added for flavor only, they are not meant to be eaten.
Add the chopped onion.
Saute until edges begin to brown. Add minced ginger and chili and fry for a minute.
Stir in cinnamon, cumin powder, cayenne, turmeric, kasuri methi and salt and fry for a couple of minutes.
Add tomato sauce and one cup of water and bring it to boil. Reduce heat to medium and simmer for 5 minutes.

Note: If the liquid gets reduced too much in volume while simmering, add more water to the mixture.
Stir in chicken pieces. Continue to simmer for about 5 minutes until the chicken is heated through.
Stir in cream and cashew paste and cook for 5 more minutes.

Note: If the volume of the liquid gets reduced too much on the stove at this stage, add more cream or milk to the mixture.
Sprinkle garam masala powder and mix it in. Transfer to a serving dish and garnish with cilantro leaves.
Serve with any paratha or rice.


For more recipes, table setting ideas and gardening tips from the author of Entertaining From an Ethnic Indian Kitchen, check out Komali Nunna's blog.  

Wednesday, April 6, 2011

Gobi Masala (Cauliflower Curry)

I was never a fan of cauliflower until I tried this recipe. It gave the cauliflower a succulent flavor that I never knew it was capable of having. I strongly encourage you to try cooking this easy recipe, even if you dislike cauliflower...you may become converted just like me!

Recipe provided courtesy of Entertaining From an Ethnic Indian Kitchen.

Serves 4-6
• 3 tablespoons vegetable oil
• 1 onion, finely chopped
• 1- inch piece ginger, minced
• 1 minced fresh green chili, such as serrano
• 1 tablespoon coriander powder
• 1 tomato, chopped
• 1 teaspoons salt or to taste
• ½ teaspoon turmeric

• 1 ½ - 2 pounds cauliflower, washed and cut into florets
• 1 teaspoon garam masala powder
• cilantro to garnish

Note: Chop all the ingredients in advance. It will make the process a lot easier and stress-free. 
Heat oil in a heavy bottom skillet over medium high heat. When the oil is hot, add the onion.
Fry until soft and edges begin to brown. Add minced ginger and chili and stir fry for 1 minute.
Add the coriander powder and stir fry for another minute.
Add the tomato and cook until it is soft and some of the moisture evaporates.
Stir in salt, turmeric and cauliflower. 
Cover the pan and cook for 10 minutes while stirring occasionally. 

Note: If there is a lot of liquid in the pan, remove the lid and cook until almost all the liquid evaporates. 

At the end, stir in garam masala powder. Mix thoroughly and serve.
Optional: Garnish with cilantro.

For more recipes, table setting ideas and gardening tips from the author of Entertaining From an Ethnic Indian Kitchen, check out Komali Nunna's blog. 

Sunday, February 27, 2011

Nimmakaya Pulihora (Lemon Rice)

This is one of my favorite recipes. When the recipe was originally developed in India, lemons were used (hence the name "lemon rice"). However, this recipe uses limes because the tartness of limes balances the spicy chilies and ginger in this recipe.

Note: This is a time-sensitive recipe. All the steps to add the ingredients must be done quickly or the dals and black mustard seeds will get burnt. I suggest measuring out all the ingredients ahead of time so that you don't waste time measuring while cooking.

Recipe provided courtesy of Entertaining From an Ethnic Indian Kitchen.

Ingredients
  • one recipe plain rice
  • 1/3 cup vegetable oil
  • 1/8 teaspoon asafetida
  • 2-3 dry whole red chilies such as chile de arbol
  • 1 tablespoon black mustard seeds
  • 2 tablespoons chena dal
  • 1 tablespoon white urad dal
  • ½ cup raw cashew nuts
  • 1-inch piece ginger, minced
  • 1-3 minced fresh green chilies, such as serrano
  • 20 fresh or dry curry leaves
  • ½ teaspoon turmeric        
  • 2 ½ teaspoons salt
  • 1/3 cup + 2 tablespoons lime juice
  • pomegranate seeds to garnish (optional)    
Prepare the rice according to the directions using only 3 ½ cups of water. Heat oil in a saucepan over medium high heat.   
Add asafetida and red chilies.  

Notes 
  • Asafetida is a gum extract from trees that can be found in Indian grocery stores. It acts as a digestive aid and prevents flatulence from occuring. If you are unable to find this ingredient, the rice will turn out fine without it.  
  • Red chilies are added for flavor only and are not meant to be eaten.
When the red chilies turn one shade darker, add the mustard seeds and cover until the spluttering subsides.   


Uncover and add white urad dal and chena dal. 


When the white urad dal turns golden brown, stir in the cashews. 


As soon as cashew nuts turn one shade darker, add curry leaves.  


As curry leaves turn crisp, add ginger, chilies, turmeric, and salt. Fry for one minute, and turn off the heat. 

 
Let it cool for 3 minutes and add lime juice.   


Now add lime juice mixture to cooked rice, and mix thoroughly.  


You must let the rice rest for at least ½ an hour for flavors to mingle before serving.   


Optional: Garnish with pomegranate seeds.

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