Sunday, May 22, 2011

Mushroom Pulao

I've realized that mushrooms can be quite polarizing: either you love them or you hate them. Here's a recipe for all my fellow mushroom-lovers out there!

For measurements and the list of ingredients for the recipe, please refer to Entertaining From an Ethnic Indian Kitchen.    

Prep: Wipe mushrooms with a damp paper towel to clean and slice them. Cut the onion and chilies.

Note: It is important not to wash mushrooms in water to avoid absorbing too much moisture.

Heat oil in a medium sauce pan over medium high heat. When the oil is hot, add bay leaf, cloves, cinnamon stick and cardamom pods.  
 
Note: Whole spices are added to flavor the dish and are not meant to be eaten.


When the cloves plump up, add onion and green chili.  


Sauté until the onion is translucent and edges begin to brown. Add ginger garlic paste and stir fry for 1 minute. Add mushrooms.


Sauté until mushrooms are slightly wilted. Stir in garam masala powder, basmati rice and salt. Mix thoroughly to coat all the rice grains with a thin film of oil and spices.


Stir in 3 ½ cups of water. At this point, you can transfer the mixture to an automatic rice cooker and finish cooking.


Alternative: Bring the rice mixture to a boil and reduce heat to the lowest setting. Cover with a lid and cook for about 20-25 minutes until the rice is done. Let it rest for 10 minutes. Fluff the rice with a fork. 

Garnish with cilantro.


Note: The recipe in Entertaining From an Ethnic Indian Kitchen also includes a garnish with paneer wrapped in edible silver leaves. I will leave that extra step for another day.

For more recipes, table setting ideas and gardening tips from the author of Entertaining From an Ethnic Indian Kitchen, check out Komali Nunna's blog.  

Thursday, May 19, 2011

Moghul Egg Korma


This mouth-watering recipe (one of my favorites) turned out to be a lot easier than I thought it would be. Of all the curries I've made so far, Moghul Egg Korma has been the first curry where I didn't make any mistakes the first time around! Just make sure you get all the ingredients together first because it is a time-sensitive recipe. It's also a great way to use up your eggs!

For measurements and the list of ingredients for the recipe, please refer to Entertaining From an Ethnic Indian Kitchen.     

Prep: Chop the onion, boil the eggs, and make the almond paste.

Heat oil in a wide-bottom skillet over medium high heat. When oil is hot, add cloves, cinnamon, and cardamom pods. Stir-fry for a few seconds. Add onion.   

Note: Whole spices are added for flavor only and are not meant to be eaten.
Saute onion until edges begin to brown. Add ginger garlic paste and stir for a minute. 
 
Add tomato paste and stir-fry for 2 minutes.
Add coriander powder, cayenne and paprika. Stir fry for a minute.
Add salt and 4 cups of water and bring it to a boil.
Reduce heat and simmer the sauce until thickened for about half an hour. Stir in almond paste and cream. Cook for 2 minutes. Add lime juice and stir to mix.

Note: Almond paste is not found in grocery stores. You can find an easy recipe for almond paste in Entertaining From an Ethnic Indian Kitchen.
Spread the eggs over the sauce. Simmer gently for 2 to 3 minutes.

Options:
1. Cut the eggs in half.
2. Keep the eggs whole but make a small slit in each of the eggs before adding them to the sauce, so that the flavor of the curry goes into the eggs.
Garnish with cilantro.                        

Serve with rice or chappati.

For more recipes, table setting ideas and gardening tips from the author of Entertaining From an Ethnic Indian Kitchen, check out Komali Nunna's blog.  

Saturday, May 7, 2011

Carrot Salad


This refreshing salad is popularly known as cachumbar in the state of Maharastra. It is a feast to the eyes as well as to the palate.

Recipe provided courtesy of Entertaining From an Ethnic Indian Kitchen.

Ingredients
  • 1/3 cup mung dal
  • 2 cups grated carrots
  • 1/3 cup coarsely grated fresh coconut
  • 1/3 cup grated raw mango (optional)
  • 2 tablespoons oil
  • 2 dry whole red chilies such as chile de arbol
  • 1 teaspoon black mustard seeds
  • 1-2 tablespoons lime juice
  • 1 teaspoon salt or to taste
  • 1/2 cup cilantro leaves
Soak dal in 2 cups of boiling water for 3 hours, and then drain.


Note: While the mung dal is soaking, grate all the other ingredients for the salad.

Combine dal, carrots, coconut and mango (if you are using it) in a salad bowl.

Note: Frozen coarsely grated fresh coconut can be bought in the freezer section of an Indian supermarket.

Heat oil in a small saucepan over medium heat. When the oil is hot add chilies. When the chilies start turn  dark, add mustard seeds and cover until the spluttering subsides. Remove from the heat and pour it over the carrot mixture along with lime juice and salt.


Gently toss to combine. Season to taste. Garnish with cilantro leaves.


Note: If you are using a raw mango, you can adjust the amount of lime juice depending on the sourness of the mango.

If you need more guidance with this recipe, check out the step by step video made by Komali Nunna.



For more recipes, table setting ideas and gardening tips from the author of Entertaining From an Ethnic Indian Kitchen, check out Komali Nunna's blog. 
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